Being interviewed and photographed was an empowering experience for me as it gave me a platform to share internal feelings that I previously felt were unimportant. It began a process of self-analysis within me that continues to this day.
— Camila
 ‘President Santos State visit, London Nov 2016:“It was the first time we welcomed a Colombian President without protesting because he represents a chance for peace in Colombia’.
Peace does not have borders and we do not stop being Colombians when we’re not living at home. Distance shouldn’t be a reason for not actively contributing to the achievement of peace in one’s homeland.

This is precisely why, despite being a migrant, I am today part of a project that looks to burst disruptively into the political landscape of Colombia through the empowerment of ordinary citizens; within Colombia, and amongst Colombians abroad.
— Angelica, London
Nursing my baby has been a very joyful experience that connects me with my son and also a meditation for me. He was born in Colombia and he will grow up with a country very different to the one I was born in, in the midst of the conflict in the 80s. He will grow up with the FARC as no longer an active guerrilla group with thousand of weapons and a country that will have worked very hard to reconcile with its past. It even surprises me to even be able to type this.
— Maria
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My little grain of sand to change the image that the world has of the Colombians is through movement as it can carry us in other places beyond that image of violence. It is true that we are a country hurt by violence through history but Colombia is also a happy country and we are able to live and transform in love and in a lot of happiness through movement, music, dance. I want people to see that in Colombia there are also other things, these rhythms and dances are also Colombia. It’s like blooming and letting something else grow.
— Ana Carolina
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My experience in being photographed and interviewed has been for me the opportunity to escape from invisibility, after so many years of frustration as victims of the Colombian conflict, it has been like to denounce, to tell our truth and to demand justice, it has been a way of living, and of keeping alive those who are no longer with us. I now feel important and protagonist of this process of postconflict that our country is living.
— Elisabeth

The truth, memory and reconciliation commission of Colombian women in the diaspora is an initiative to empower women in the diaspora to become agents of change in the Colombian peace process and in their host countries, hosted by Conciliation Resources in London.

During more than 50 years of war, hundreds of thousands of Colombians left their homeland. The journey of migration has been long, and often painful.  Conciliation Resources works to support women of the Colombian diaspora to share their stories, memories and hopes and to claim a place and a voice in the county's peace process.

The recent referendum on the peace deal in Colombia has polarised Colombian society, demonstrating more than ever the need for national dialogue and reconciliation among the Colombian people.

The experience of being part of a photo shoot and interviewed has been novel and has shown me an unseen part of me. In other words, it has contributed to my self-confidence building and my own empowering process.
— Sofia
I have a dream of being able to see and enjoy with people, that no more bullets are heard, that the value of the vote is the same value of dignity, because everything becomes another meaning with the colour of hope.
— Yanira
Artistic transformation for one of the Colombian woman by dancer Ana Carolina, Barcelona 2017

Artistic transformation for one of the Colombian woman by dancer Ana Carolina, Barcelona 2017

Artistic transformation for one of the Colombian woman by dancer Ana Carolina, Barcelona 2017

Artistic transformation for one of the Colombian woman by dancer Ana Carolina, Barcelona 2017